Cleveland’s DeShone Kizer and Week 1 Indianapolis starter Scott Tolzien were not in the survey.

I projected Kizer with a 4.0 tier average — in the Blake Bortles range for now — while slotting Tolzien at the bottom with a 4.5. All over/unders are courtesy of the Westgate Las Vegas Superbook as of Sept. 5.

Because of a number of decisions you have to make, you can’t skip any cut-scenes —even if this is your second time going through the story mode. It doesn’t matter because what happens in the story mode relies on the choices you have made.

There isn’t just one singular ending to this story mode, and your choices will determine which ending occurs. The scenes run long at certain points and save checkpoints aren’t as convenient. There were times when I was scared to quit the game because that would mean that I’d have to listen to the same dialogue again.

The ball placed on either hash mark eliminates lots of options for both sides of the ball. More often than not, the ball will be run toward the field (away from the sidelines), because there is more space out there. If the ball is run into the boundary (toward the sidelines), it’s typically an inside zone, or in the rare instance there’s a TE down there, maybe a power play. Being on a hash narrows down the amount of pressures that can be run.

Usually, if a team will run a zone blitz where the DE drops into coverage, it wants that DE to be into the boundary because he has to cover less ground. When the ball is in the middle of the field, a zone pressure can come from anywhere. Also, when a team is in a 3×1 formation on the hash — three players are out wide in the formation, with one into the boundary — this really defines the pressure situation for the offense. The defense has to cheat big time to cover all that ground to the field if it wants to bring pressure. It’s easier to see for the offense.